Go to church this sunday!

I mean, I don’t care if you go to real church, but definitely read Casey Fleming’s weekly sermon at (non)secular girl.

Any project she involves herself in is worth checking out.  But I have to share this one here, because she seems to be writing from the same conviction that got me started on this blog. From last week:

“I also began to see my nonfiction writing as a form of service and vocation that harkened back to my spiritual upbringing.  I recognized what I thought of as a failure of liberal Christians in the face of rising Christian fundamentalism.  We had lost our voice, or at least our willingness to use it. ” 

Amen.

Her approach is a lot more graceful than mine.  My favorite sermon so far has been the Sermon for the First Sunday in Ordinary Time.  Here’s part of it:

More people attend mass on Christmas and Easter; these are holy days of obligation and Catholics love them some obligation.  As I get older, I do the opposite: some years I attend Christmas mass, and rarely attend Easter mass.  I show up tempus per annum, the latin phrase for “times of the year”, translated in English as “ordinary time.”   I need lifting when I feel most lowly and alone, most human.

Perhaps that makes sense.  The Catholic writer Henri Nouwen said, “I realized that healing begins with our taking our pain out of its diabolic isolation and seeing that whatever we suffer, we suffer it in communion with all of humanity, and yes all of creation.”  We can display vanity in our suffering too. We must learn ordinariness.  We have to be common to find communion.

In ordinary time we will arrive at the most holy of our life’s work.  In ordinary time we will be asked to recognize the everyday-miraculous: sunrise, schoolroom, sentence, spoon, soap, sleep.  It is not the high drama of midnight mass with its trumpets and Halleluia’s, nor is it the dusky hours of an Easter vigil.  But it may be the time between birth and death—ordinary time—when life demands from us the most humbling and extraordinary task of coming out of our mother’s lives and into our own. 

Amen.



Double amen?  Anyway, check it out this Sunday and every Sunday to come.



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